The most important facts you should know about Indigenous Peoples' Day

FILE-Members of the Wampanoag perform a dance as they share their cultural dances with the public and call on them to take part with them at Indigenous Peoples Day in Newton, Massachusetts on October 10, 2022. (JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images)

Indigenous Peoples' Day is a holiday that many states have acknowledged along with or in place of Columbus Day. 

President Biden first formally recognized the holiday in 2021, but states have taken different approaches to how to recognize the day. 

The holiday serves as a day to acknowledge and celebrate the contributions Indigenous communities have made in America. 

It is also a time to honor the history of Indigenous people and their resilience. 

Below is everything you need to know about Indigenous Peoples' Day.

Indigenous-Peoples-Day-event.jpg

FILE-Terry Goedel performs a hoop dance at Indigenous Peoples Day in Newton, Massachusetts on October 10, 2022. (Photo by JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images)

WHAT IS JUNETEENTH? THE HISTORY BEHIND THE OLDEST COMMEMORATION OF THE ABOLITION OF SLAVERY IN THE US 

  1. When is Indigenous Peoples' Day?
  2. Is Indigenous Peoples' Day a federal holiday?
  3. What is the purpose of Indigenous Peoples' Day?

1. When is Indigenous Peoples' Day?

Indigenous Peoples' Day is recognized on the second Monday in October. 

The day is celebrated on the same day as Columbus Day. 

Columbus Day became a national holiday in 1937, and has been celebrated for decades since to celebrate Columbus, the Italian explorer, and his crew who came from Spain in 1492 and sighted what would become America. 

PROGRESSIVES URGE SUPPORTERS TO SEE THANKSGIVING AS ‘INDIGENOUS DAY OF MOURNING’

In more recent years, Columbus Day has become a controversial holiday, and many states have elected to replace Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples' Day. 

Indigenous-Peoples-Day-event-II.jpg

FILE-Members of the Wampanoag perform a dance as they share their cultural dances with the public and call on them to take part with them at Indigenous Peoples Day in Newton, Massachusetts on October 10, 2022. (Photo by JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty

2. Is Indigenous Peoples' Day a federal holiday?

Indigenous Peoples' Day is not technically a federal holiday, although the second Monday in October is a federal holiday due to Columbus Day. 

This means that there is no mail delivery on the day, and banks will be closed. For the most part, most stores and other businesses will operate on the day. 

Whether Columbus Day is celebrated as an official holiday or not depends on where you live and where you work. 

In 2021, President Biden was the first president to recognize Indigenous Peoples' Day formally. 

7b71ae06-White-House.jpg

FILE-An exterior view of the northern side of the White House in Washington, D.C. President Biden formally recognized Indigenous Peoples' Day in 2021. (Photo by Nicolas Economou/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

"For generations, Federal policies systematically sought to assimilate and displace Native people and eradicate Native cultures," Biden wrote in the Indigenous Peoples’ Day proclamation. "Today, we recognize Indigenous peoples’ resilience and strength as well as the immeasurable positive impact that they have made on every aspect of American society."

States have made their own decisions about the day, with some states completely dropping Columbus Day for Indigenous Peoples' Day, while others have decided to celebrate both.

3. What is the purpose of Indigenous Peoples' Day?

The purpose of Indigenous Peoples' Day is to recognize Indigenous people who have lived in America for thousands of years. 

It is a day to "honor the perseverance and courage of Indigenous peoples, show our gratitude for the myriad contributions they have made to our world, and renew our commitment to respect Tribal sovereignty and self-determination," the White House website states. 

The day recognizes Native Americans' history and culture. 

On the day, there are often events, performances and ceremonies across the country to honor the occasion. 

Ashlyn Messier is a writer for Fox News Digital. 

Get the latest updates on this story at FOXNews.com