Families connect virtually for first night of Passover amid pandemic

The Magy family connected over Zoom to celebrate the first night of Passover.

Normally, the parking lot at Beth El Synagogue in St. Louis Park would be filled with cars for the first night of Passover. This year, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the celebrations of the old and sacred meal of Seder will be happening all across the world through 2020 technology.

“We’re going to start at the beginning; it’s a story that has a sad beginning and a happy ending,” said David Magy as he began to read at the Seder.

Wednesday night, David Magy and his family gathered to share that sacred story – in a whole new way. 

“While it’s not the same, it’s certainly nice to be able to see everybody – it’s better than nothing,” said Magy.

Through a virtual Seder celebration, Magy’s family from across the country was able to connect. 

“Very, very different feeling than in the past, but a lot less dishes to clean up,” said Magy.

This is the story for so many families during the spring holiday season.

“As opposed to social distancing, we’re actually talking about socially enhancing,” said Beth El Rabbi Avi Olitzky.

Olitzky says they’re holding all of their services virtually. He has found that being apart right now is bringing his community closer together.

“These are the fleeting connections that we have during this time,” said Olitzky.

Connections and traditions that live on to create new stories.

With Easter coming up on Sunday, many more families will be finding these creative ways to stay connected and keep tradition in new ways.