Hurricane Blanca remnants will likely make it to Minnesota

The major hurricane that is now a tropical storm and just made the earliest landfall for the tropical season in Mexico history may be heading this way. Now I'm by no means suggesting that she will still be a tropical system when she gets here. But her leftovers have their sights set on appearing in Minnesota skies. So how is this possible?

Well, when any sort of storm system dies, tropical or otherwise, it doesn't just disappear completely. The atmosphere is like a fluid, therefore, anything that falls apart just gets absorbed back into the system and continues on in the same general direction that it was heading. But of course, since it's a fluid, every single motion affects one another. So while the hurricane falls apart, its leftover moisture, gets absorbed by other pieces of the atmosphere before it's eventually rained out. Those remnants, that leftover moisture, is likely headed for Minnesota.

So here is a vorticity map of the United States Monday morning…

 

Vorticity is a fancy meteorological term for spin… it shows areas of spin… aka low pressure centers. You can see the one I have circled that shows up as a blob of color. That is the tightly packed area of low pressure that we call a hurricane. This hurricane is pushing north and will be impacting the Mexican coast. But now look at the forecast for early Wednesday morning…

 

A trough moved into the inter-mountain west that you see circled, but far less organized than a hurricane so there's little bits of color all over the place. BUT, the leftover components (the moisture) from Blanca was sucked up by this trough. The trough is moving eastward toward the plains and will have to drop its heavy moisture somewhere. Well, its current target is the Upper Midwest. Check out the rainfall potential by the end of the week…