5 facts about the first day of summer

DOESN'T ALWAYS FALL ON JUNE 21

The first day of summer can't always arrive on the 21st day of June. The Earth's tilt, elliptical orbit and leap year, can have the summer solstice arriving anytime between June 20 and June 22. The summer solstice occurs at the moment the earth's tilt toward the sun is at a maximum. This year that is at 11:38 a.m. this Sunday.

THE MOST DAYLIGHT OF THE YEAR

Here in Minnesota, the sunrise 5:26 / sunset 9:03 will allow for 15 HOURS 36 MINUTES 53 SECONDS of daylight. However, if you take into consideration nautical twilight (3:59 am), and nautical dusk (10:30 pm), the time you see a hint of light, then the day is 18 HOURS 31 MINUTES long.

THE FIRST DAY OF WINTER DOWN UNDER

While we are hitting the beach here in Minnesota and Wisconsin, the folks down under are break out the heavy coats. The tilt of the earth has the Southern Hemisphere pointed away from the sun, resulting in the coldest part of the year.

HOTTEST DAYS ARE AHEAD

The first day of summer is just the beginning of the warm weather. The most direct rays of the sun are now shining on us and the earth will gain more heat than it loses. Here in Minnesota, we get warmer and warmer through the month of July. Our warmest average high and low in the Twin Cities is from July 14-15 with 84°/64° for those temps.

FARTHEST FROM THE SUN

As you read above, the sun is pointed towards the sun for us in the north, and that is a good thing, as the earth is at its farthest point from the sun. In the winter, we are at our closest point to the sun but we are tilted away from its direct rays.

We would love to see your summer weather photos! Please email them to photos@fox9.com.

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