Hillary Clinton wins Minnesota: See how each county voted

Donald Trump has been elected the 45th President of the United States. Hillary Clinton called Trump to concede, and Trump's win was declared by both the Associated Press and Fox News shortly after 1:30 a.m. CT.

Minnesota was too close to call on Election Night, but the Associated Press race call came at 10:14 a.m. Wednesday, giving Minnesota to Clinton.

Minnesota election results - President of the United States
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MORE RESULTS: PRESIDENT | MINNESOTA LEGISLATURE | AMENDMENT | DISTRICT 1 | DISTRICT 2 | DISTRICT 3 | DISTRICT 4 | DISTRICT 5 | DISTRICT 6 | DISTRICT 7 | DISTRICT 8

CAUCUS RESULTS: Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump each failed to win their party’s respective caucus in Minnesota, with Bernie Sanders winning the Democratic caucuses and Marco Rubio winning the Republican caucuses.

HOW MINNESOTA VOTED LAST TIME: In 2012, President Barack Obama defeated Republican challenger Mitt Romney by 7.7 percent in Minnesota, en route to a second term.

HOW EACH COUNTY VOTED IN 2012: Romney won the popular vote in 59 of Minnesota’s 87 counties in 2012, but President Obama claimed 4 of the state’s 5 most-populated counties. Those victories included 66 percent of the vote in Ramsey County, 62 percent of the vote in Hennepin County and 63 percent of the vote in St. Louis County.

DEM WINNING STREAK: Since 1932, Minnesota has voted Democrats for president, with just one exception – Richard Nixon’s landslide victory in 1972. Only Washington, D.C. has a longer streak of voting for Democrats.

WHAT THE POLLS SAY: The most recent Star Tribune Minnesota poll (Oct. 22) gave Clinton an 8 point lead over Trump. The most recent KSTP SurveyUSA (Sept. 20) gave Clinton a 6 point lead.

BALLOT DRAMA: A challenge by the Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party to remove Donald Trump and Mike Pence failed in the Minnesota Supreme Court. In September, DFL chairman Ken Martin filed a petition to remove Trump and Pence from the ballot, claiming Minnesota Secretary of State Steve Simon should not have accepted the Republican Party’s “certificate of nomination” because they did not follow proper procedure when alternate electors were nominated. The Supreme Court order on the ballot challenge focused on whether it came too late, not on whether the GOP erred in its nominating process. The secretary of state had notified the court that a decision needed to be made by Sept. 12 in order to “ensure proper and timely printing of ballots” prior to the first day of early voting on Sept. 23.


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